Category Archives: Train

(Re)Thinking Challenging Kids: CPS Training Experience

With a partnership from our friends at the Flawless Foundation, a not-for-profit organization advocating for people with brain-based behavioral challenges, Think:Kids recently had the pleasure of having Flawless intern, recent Columbia University graduate and aspiring psychologist, Tre Gabriel, help report on our Summer 2019 Tier 1  training. Here he shares his insights on what he gained

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Collaborative Problem Solving in the Workplace

Everyone has had that person at work whose behavior frustrates you. It might be your colleague, your boss, a report of yours or even your CEO. Difficult behavior in the workplace strains team dynamics, damages workplace morale and culture, and leads to enormous losses in productivity. If the behavior doesn’t cross the line into something

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Why is it so Hard to Change Problem Behavior?

The answer is actually quite simple.  Our understanding of how to change problem behavior comes from our understanding of why the problem behavior exists in the first place. And our explanation for why people behave poorly is typically wrong! When someone doesn’t behave or perform as we would like them to, our default assumption is

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One Family’s Journey with CPS

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This is a guest blog post by Certified Trainer, Randy Jones. Looking back I can now see that my families’ expedition into Collaborative Problem Solving actually began over two decades ago. My wife and I have provided services to those living with cognitive disabilities for over 20 years now. In the beginning we worked with

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Getting Detained Youth Out of Isolation and into Collaboration

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This week’s episode of This American Life is called “Not It.” In this episode, reporters relay three true stories in which instead of solving a problem in the community, officials simply shuttled that problem off to someone else. While the specific stories aren’t directly relevant to youth with challenging behaviors, as I listened I couldn’t

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