Category Archives: Train

Why is it so Hard to Change Problem Behavior?

The answer is actually quite simple.  Our understanding of how to change problem behavior comes from our understanding of why the problem behavior exists in the first place. And our explanation for why people behave poorly is typically wrong! When someone doesn’t behave or perform as we would like them to, our default assumption is

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One Family’s Journey with CPS

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This is a guest blog post by Certified Trainer, Randy Jones. Looking back I can now see that my families’ expedition into Collaborative Problem Solving actually began over two decades ago. My wife and I have provided services to those living with cognitive disabilities for over 20 years now. In the beginning we worked with

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Getting Detained Youth Out of Isolation and into Collaboration

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This week’s episode of This American Life is called “Not It.” In this episode, reporters relay three true stories in which instead of solving a problem in the community, officials simply shuttled that problem off to someone else. While the specific stories aren’t directly relevant to youth with challenging behaviors, as I listened I couldn’t

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Brown School is Doing Well!!!!

A Guest Post by Principal Kirk Downing, Brown School For several years I had thought about implementing the Collaborative Problem Solving approach at Brown School, but I could never find traction to get the initiative rolling. A host of conventional thoughts prevented me from getting started; I don’t have the budget, my teachers are far

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Follow up to: Massachusetts DOE wants to hear YOUR thoughts on seclusion and restraint in schools

A Clinician’s Request for Change Our letter to the SEPP in support of the proposed new regulations on seclusion and restraint in Massachusetts I am writing in my role as a clinical psychologist to support the Department for its proposed new regulations on seclusion and restraint in Massachusetts schools, and the desire they reflect to

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