Tag Archives: Schools

The Most Important Back to School Supply

The one thing everyone needs this school year. As schools across the country open their doors to our children, we hear a lot about back to school supplies – binders, notebooks, mechanical pencils, graph paper, calculators, maybe even a lock to keep things safe in lockers. I know it was one of my favorite rituals

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Welcome Changes to Rules Regarding Restraint and Seclusion in Schools

Here at Think:Kids, we have been an active part of the effort to reduce, if not eliminate, the use of restraint and seclusion in schools and other institutional settings for well over a decade.  Our approach, Collaborative Problem Solving, was implemented as the model of care at Cambridge Health Alliance’s child and adolescent inpatient units

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Follow up to: Massachusetts DOE wants to hear YOUR thoughts on seclusion and restraint in schools

A Clinician’s Request for Change Our letter to the SEPP in support of the proposed new regulations on seclusion and restraint in Massachusetts I am writing in my role as a clinical psychologist to support the Department for its proposed new regulations on seclusion and restraint in Massachusetts schools, and the desire they reflect to

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Massachusetts DOE wants to hear YOUR thoughts on seclusion and restraint in schools.

Back in May, we blogged about a possible federal ban on seclusion and restraint in schools. (See that post, which includes a lot of information about why this initiative is important, by clicking here.) We are thrilled to see that changing regulations related to seclusion and restraint is getting both federal and state attention. In

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Tips for successfully implementing CPS across your organization

The number of agencies asking Think:Kids for site-wide training on Collaborative Problem Solving is growing. As a result, we have been talking quite a bit around the conference room table about “Implementation Science,” which is the study of how to implement a new approach successfully, once we know that the approach works. Here’s the issue:

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